Why Women Kill Season 2 Episode 10 Review: The Lady Confesses

This wouldn’t be a story for you if you were looking for happy endings.

No matter how you slice it, even the happiest ending of Why Women Kill Season 2 Episode 10 comes at a great cost.

By the end of Why Women Kill Season 2, nobody was left unchanged.

Before we launch into the review proper, I want to prepare you.  First, they released only three photos for the finale. That stinks. Second, for a full recap of the episode, click the link above.

This review will get all philosophical on y’all because after watching, I had an epiphany about how the show relates to the present and our dim view of achievement and happiness. So hang onto your hats, people!!

Why Women Kill is a dark comedy with a lot to say about us.

By the time Alma’s mind warped entirely, it was hard not to see the correlation between her desperation to be seen (and Rita’s, too) and our current obsession with social media and identity politics.

As the season began, Alma had dreams of being someone else. She stood outside restaurant windows, longing to be included, to be seen, to be a part of that which she was not.

Although she had a particular yearning to be a part of the Elysium Garden Club, she could have focused on any entity, group, or person with her desires.

It was only after the story got rolling with Alma at the helm that we learned the central object of her desire, Rita, once walked in Alma’s footsteps.

Alma and Rita stand for any of us who look elsewhere for satisfaction instead of within.

Sadly, that’s where we are in 2021. Whether as individuals on social media or media organizations utilizing clickbait measures to gain audiences, we’re all looking elsewhere for fulfillment, leaving our integrity and our very souls to wither and die on the vine.

Alma’s and Rita’s long climb to the top found them splattered on the ground just as surely as the devastating reports we receive of people daringly leaning over the edge of a cliff hoping to lure love and affection from the masses with the perfect selfie.

It’s tragic, but buried within this story is hope, too.

While Garden Club members like Grace were forced to face their deepest secrets and fears, they’re still standing. Their falling facade didn’t end their lives any more than it ruined them.

Of the survivors, Dee faced the most destruction. She lost the only family she knew and was almost taken down with them out of her fierce loyalty to her parents.

But for all of the bad messaging that Alma and Bertram bestowed upon their daughter, they never managed to kill her spirit.

Whether she was with Scooter just because she thought someone like her deserved to cavort with a looker like him or she latched onto the good man she found in Vern when she had the chance, she was using what she had inside to change her life for the better.

Similarly, Vern utilized his gifts of intelligence and keen insight to make a living, and his kindness for those who needed it most earned him respect and reward.

In a rare burst of insight from Scooter, he dearly hoped that his son wouldn’t inherit his good looks so that, like the couple who would raise him, he’ll have smaller dreams that are easily achieved and won’t rely on his looks to get ahead.

Not only are they fleeting, but they put Scooter in the position of allowing himself to be used rather than find something he was good at to bring him happiness.

As it turned out, Alma, Bertram, and Rita had it all.

Rita was the first to sell herself to get ahead, thinking that money would buy her happiness. In her desperation to get away from Texas, she, like Scooter, sold her soul to make the transition.

Alma betrayed anyone and everyone to achieve her dream, which lasted only one night.

She sold her daughter down the river and allowed her husband to take the blame and his life for her crimes, all so that she could feel what he believed Rita felt having it all.

But like social media of the 21st Century, social clubs of the 20th Century were nothing by status and hype. Those who belonged were playing a role, stepping outside of themselves, putting on a brave face for the world to fit in.

But to fit in with what? Why are we still today seeking affirmation from strangers?

Perhaps Alma’s insanity, seeing the world as she wishes it to be instead of living in reality, is the best we can hope for. Looking to clickbait-seeking media to shape our reality instead of living individually within it sure paints us smack dab in the middle of a woeful, dark comedy, doesn’t it?

What did you think?

Was everyone deserving of their fate?

How could they have changed their fate, and how long ago would they have had to take action to do it?

Is there any hope for us if we continue to follow the crowd and seek outward affirmation?

Carissa Pavlica is the managing editor and a staff writer and critic for TV Fanatic. She’s a member of the Critic’s Choice Association, enjoys mentoring writers, conversing with cats, and passionately discussing the nuances of television and film with anyone who will listen. Follow her on Twitter and email her here at TV Fanatic.

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